PC World

  1. Microsoft released the first build of Windows 11 on Monday. Here’s how to get it and try it out for yourself.

    You’ll need two things: first, a PC that meets the minimum hardware specifications of Windows 11. Second, you’ll need to join the Windows Insider program so that your PC can receive the first beta or Windows Insider builds of Windows 11. While it’s possible that Microsoft will release a standalone .ISO file of Windows 11, those plans hadn’t been finalized as of Friday, when we asked.

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  2. Intel said Monday it is completely changing the way in which generations of its microprocessors have been defined, discussed, and evaluated, paving the way for chips to be measured in angstroms, not nanometers.

    Specifically, Intel is rewriting the terminology associated with its process technology, it said at an “Intel Accelerated” presentation. Going forward, Intel’s 10nm “enhanced SuperFIN” technology will now be called “Intel 7,” mentally placing it on the same tier as the same 7nm process technology AMD uses for its Ryzen chips. Intel began signaling this shift in March, but today it’s official.

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  3. Microsoft has begun rolling out the integrated Teams Chat function to a small subset of Windows Insiders testing out Windows 11, Microsoft said this week. Here’s how to use Teams Chat (formally called Chat from Microsoft Teams) within Windows 11.

    For now, if you don’t have Teams Chat in your preview build of Windows 11, don’t worry. Microsoft said that it will be rolling out the new functionality to a wider group of users over the next few weeks, and months, and adding new features as well.  In fact, Windows 11 Insider Build 22000.100 adds Teams Chat to all (or least the majority) of Insiders in the Dev Channel.

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  4. Intel executives say that the company will be unable to supply enough processors to meet PC demand, as the factors driving ongoing chip shortages affect it, too. But surprisingly there’s some good news as well. Intel said it will probably eat the resulting increase in prices, at least where PC companies are concerned.

    “We remain in a highly constrained environment where we are unable to fully supply customer demand,” said George Davis, Intel’s chief financial officer, as part of a SeekingAlpha transcript of Intel’s second quarter earnings call. In that call, the company admitted that it can’t get materials—specifically substrate—to make enough chips to keep pace.

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  5. What’s the best CPU for your next laptop? That was an easy answer just a few years ago, when Intel’s product line was far and away the strongest. But with multiple generations of AMD’s game-changing Ryzen chips finally giving Intel some real competition, you have more to think about.

    We’re here to help you navigate this wider landscape, but without thousands of words and stacks of charts. We’ll start with a quick primer on the strengths and weaknesses of each chip, then we’ll discuss how to pick the right one for you. To keep this from getting too overwhelming, we’ll stick only to the mainstream CPUs that typically go into three-pound, thin-and-light laptops, rather than get into the high-performance chips that go into thicker and heavier gaming laptops.

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